DB2

1_Name
2_Email
3_Current Position
4_Location
5_Current research interests (no more than a few sentences)
6_Previous research interests (no more than a few sentences)
7_Methods you currently use
8_Methods you previously used and are technically proficient in
9_Briefly describe what you are looking for in a collaborator
10_Would you be open to other types of collaborations than what you listed above?
11_List several keywords describing your research interests
12_Your research involves (check all that apply)
13_Are you willing to write grants to support this research?
Submitted From
Bradley Wile
b-wile@onu.edu
Associate Professor of Chemistry
Ohio Northern University
My group focusses on making new or modified organic ligands to support transition metal catalysts. These catalysts could be used to make pharmaceuticals or plastics, convert waste materials into commodity chemicals, or transform crude oil into consumer products. Understanding the structure and bonding of these metal complexes allows us to make informed decisions about how to improve their performance. Ultimately, our work finds meaning by making chemical reactions more sustainable or efficient.
We prepare ligands using simple methods (i.e. one or two steps from commercially-available materials) under benign conditions. We attempt to conduct reactions using sustainable solvents, often employing temperature controlled reactors rather than reflux apparatus. These ligands are combined with transition metals under inert atmosphere conditions (Schlenk/glovebox) to generate metal complexes capable of catalyzing a variety of organic transformations. We probe the ground state electronic structure (X-ray diffraction, UV-Vis, etc.) and other features (1D and 2D/multinuclear NMR, IR, etc.) and tie these features to catalytic competency using model transformations such as cross-coupling or carbonyl reduction.
Hydrogenation/hydrosilylation of olefins and carbonyl-containing species.
We are always looking for collaborations that fit with our research interests. Possible examples include biological evaluation of complexes (e.g. topoisomerase II inhibition/anticancer), computational analysis of ligand and metal complex FMO energies, electrochemical studies of complexes featuring redox-active ligands.
Yes
metals, catalysis, catalyst development, organometallic, inorganic, electronic structure, ligand synthesis
Undergraduates
Yes
140.228.194.190
Gerardo Carfagno
gerardo.carfagno@manhattan.edu
Assistant Professor
Manhattan College
Ecology
Behavior
Physiology
Toxicology
Herpetology
Yes
Undergraduates
Yes
149.61.46.68
Gary A. Morris
garymorris@stedwards.edu
Faculty?
St. Edwards
1. Physics Education Research (item response curves, evaluating the effectiveness of assessment instruments, using assessment to improve instruction)
2. Air Quality Research (measurements of ozone, sulfur dioxide, and ozone precursors by balloon sounding and surface instruments; analysis of air quality data from in situ and remote sensing instruments; atmospheric modeling: dynamics and chemistry)
3. publication list at: http://works.bepress.com/gary_morris/
1. Stratospheric dynamics and chemistry: the ozone hole and stratospheric ozone - models and measurements
2. Atmospheric electricity: the global electrical circuit - using ground-based instruments to measure the electrical activity of the planet; long-term studies relating the electrical activity of the planet to climate change.
1. ozonesondes
2. radiosondes
3. IDL programs
4. HYSPLIT
5. statistical analyses
6. item response curves
7. transition matrices
1. trajectory mapping
2. Kalman filtering
3. Fortran programming
interest in:
air quality
atmospheric chemistry
meteorology
environmental science
environmental education
environmental outreach
physics education
ability to program (in IDL, especially helpful, but any language will do)
Yes
air quality
ozone pollution
climate change
atmospheric chemistry
meteorology
environmental science
environmental education
environmental outreach
physics education
Undergraduates, Master's students, Ph.D. students
Yes
108.197.226.229
John Deisz
jdeisz@callutheran.edu
Position
Cal Lutheran
1. Computational quantum many-body physics. 2. Computational modeling of superconductors.
1. GPU-based molecular dynamics simulations. 2. Simulations of quantum mechanical spin systems.
Yes
Undergraduates
Yes
108.197.226.229

© New American Colleges and Universities. All rights reserved.