2017 Summer Institute: Valparaiso University

NAC&U’s 2017 SUMMER INSTITUTE:
Dialogue and Understanding: Conversations Across Difference
June 21 – 23, 2017
Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, Indiana
Pre-conference meetings on June 20, 2017

  Register now!
  • Valpo's LogoHow do we support civil dialogue on difficult subjects in our classrooms and on our campuses?
  • Can we encourage and facilitate this dialogue?
  • How do we protect the rights of our students and faculty to hold and to express opinions and beliefs?
  • How does this relate to our common belief in civic engagement?
  • Do we have the capacity and skills to create such safe spaces for civil discourse?

Plenary speaker Frederick Lawrence, CEO and Secretary of Phi Beta Kappa and an attorney, will speak in the morning about civil rights and first amendment issues. Our second plenary speaker, Libby Roderick, Associate Director of the Center for Advancing Faculty Excellence at the University of Alaska-Anchorage, will speak about how to manage difficult dialogues in higher education. The Institute schedule will include several facilitated small group discussions on various difficult topics.

The NAC&U Summer Institute, held for faculty and administrators from member colleges and universities, provides a unique opportunity for professional development, discussion of issues common to our member institutions, and networking.

Registration is now open.

 

 

 

Speakers

Frederick Lawrence
“The Contours of Expression: Free Speech and Civility”
Fred-Lawrence_HS2-200wAcross the country, conflicting claims of free expression, civility, and safety raise complex issues on our campuses, in our communities, and throughout social media. How do we balance seemingly opposing values to enable free expression, yet foster a climate of mutual respect and sense of personal safety in our discourse on important topics?”

About Frederick Lawrence
Frederick M. Lawrence is secretary of The Phi Beta Kappa Society, the nation’s most prestigious academic honor society.

Lawrence is a Phi Beta Kappa member inducted at Williams College and a Yale Law school graduate.  He has spent much of his career at institutions committed to providing students with a solid foundation in the arts and sciences. His body of work also reflects a lifetime of advocating for the arts and sciences, civil liberties and human rights, both nationally and internationally.

He recently served as Senior Research Scholar at Yale Law School.  He also served as President and Professor of Politics at Brandeis University. While there he ensured the future of the Rose Art Museum, a premier university-based museum of contemporary art; raised over $250 million in support of a wide range of programs, including financial aid; and oversaw a dramatic increase in the number of applications which reached an all-time high during his administration.

Lawrence previously served as Dean and Robert Kramer Research Professor at the George Washington University Law School and on the faculty of the Boston University School of Law, where he received Boston University’s Metcalf Award for Excellence in Teaching. He has written extensively, lectured internationally, and testified before Congress on bias crimes and freedom of expression. He is the author of “Punishing Hate: Bias Crimes Under American Law,” published by Harvard University Press.

Lawrence frequently contributes op-eds to various news sources, such as the Boston Globe, MSNBC Online, and Huffington Post. Prior to his academic career, he served as an Assistant United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York and as Chief of that office’s Civil Rights Unit.

For more information, below are videos of Frederick Lawrence:

Frederick M. Lawrence, talking about the rise of hate crimes on CNN Tonight w/ Don Lemon, published on 2/22/17
Frederick M. Lawrence, discusses students’ right to protest & debate presidential election on Fox Business’ Varney & Company, published on 11/14/16
Frederick M. Lawrence speaking on Free Expression, published on 5/23/16

Libby Roderick
“Difficult Dialogues in Higher Education: Effectively Tackling the Tough IsLibby1-200wsues of our Times”
Although the ability to conduct difficult dialogues is at the heart of the university mission, few faculty or administrators have been equipped with the skills and tools to do so effectively.  Indeed, numerous faculty report avoiding controversial topics because they lack the necessary confidence and skills to ensure productive discussions.  The capacity to conduct meaningful conversations on difficult topics is critical for American universities as we strive to equip our students to find ways to tackle daunting social, environmental, political and economic challenges in an ever more diverse and stressed democratic nation.

Libby Roderick, Director of the Difficult Dialogues Initiative at the University of Alaska, will offer an overview of programs and resources that exist to help us engage controversial issues on our campuses.  She will also share best practices, engage participants in a brief difficult dialogue, and help them explore ways to replicate this work on their own campuses.

About Libby Roderick
Libby Roderick is Associate Director for the Center for Advancing Faculty Excellence and Director of the Difficult Dialogues Initiative at the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA). She is Associate Editor of Start Talking:  A Handbook for Engaging Difficult Dialogues in Higher Education, co-author of Stop Talking: Indigenous Ways of Teaching and Learning and Difficult Dialogues in Higher Education; editor of Alaska Native Cultures and Issues; and editor of Toxic Friday:  Resources for Addressing Faculty Bullying Higher Education.  She works with faculty in Alaska, throughout the U.S., and in South Africa to increase their capacity to effectively conduct difficult dialogues in higher education. Libby is also an internationally recognized, award-winning singer/songwriter and recording artist.

 

Preliminary Schedule

Pre-Conference

Tuesday, June 20 2-6 pm Board Meeting
2-6 pm Chief Academic Officers Meeting
2-6 pm Ambassadors Meeting
2-6 pm Student Affairs Officers Meeting
2-6 pm Spouse Activities
6:30 – 8:30 pm Dinner for Presidents & Spouses
6:30 – 8:30 pm Dinner for CAOs, SSAOs,
NAC&U Faculty Ambassadors
Wednesday, June 21 8-8:30 am Breakfast
8:30 – 9:30 am Board/CAO/Ambassador Joint Meeting
8:30 – 11 am SSAO Meeting
8:30 – 4 pm Spouse Activities
9:30 – 11 am Board Meeting
9:30 – 11 am CAO Meeting
9:30 – 11 am Ambassadors Meeting

Conference

Wednesday, June 21 11:30 am – 1:45 pm Welcome, Lunch, Presidential Panel
Managing Difficult Subjects on Campus
Panelists:
Daan Braveman, President, Nazareth College;
Fayneese Miller, President, Hamline University
1:45 – 2:45 pm Valpo student panel
2:45 – 3 pm Break
3 – 4 pm Concurrent Sessions (see below for descriptions)
4 – 5 pm Student Prize Presentations
6:00 – 9 pm Evening Event:
Dinner on campus followed by
an excursion to the
Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore
Thursday, June 22 8:30 am Breakfast
9-10:30 am Keynote speaker:
Frederick Lawrence
The Contours of Expression:
Free Speech
and Civility
10:30 – 10:45 am Break
10:45 – 11:45 am Facilitated group discussions
12 – 2 pm Lunch with keynote speaker:
Libby Roderick
Difficult Dialogues in Higher Education:
Effectively Tackling the Tough Issues
of our Times

2 – 3 pm Facilitated group discussions
3 – 3:15 pm Break
3:15 – 4:15 pm Campus team discussions
to develop strategies
to take back to campus
4:30 – 5:30 pm Presidential panel
6 pm Free time: For more on Downtown Valparaiso
Friday, June 23 8:30 am Breakfast
9 – 11 am Campus Team Reports/Closing Summary

 

Wednesday concurrent sessions:

DuShaun Branch, Stephen Maynard Caliendo, Dorothy Pleas, Kimberly Sluis, all of North Central College
Addressing Student Concerns in the Aftermath of the Election

Representatives from Academic Affairs and Student Affairs worked separately and together throughout 2016 to address sensitive issues that surfaced in the midst of the presidential election campaign. A series of loosely structured Fireside Chats, highly structured Topics In Politics lectures, and a variety of events held in conjunction with major campaign activities (e.g., Iowa Caucuses, debates, Election Night) resulted in powerful and diverse engagement opportunities for students, faculty and staff members. This session will feature details about many of these events, as well as a report on the way our Counseling Center responded to new demands after the election.

Lisa Durant-Jones, Nazareth College
Developing a Strategic Plan for Diversity

In the Spring of 2016, the President of Nazareth College convened an Ad Hoc Committee to advance a strategic plan for Diversity and Inclusion that would guide the college in advancing this work. An early product of this effort was the development of a definition for the College that inform the strategic planning. A discussion of this development and the steps utilized to gain campus input could serve as a guide to other campuses.

David Salomon, The Sage Colleges  
Democracy Under Fire: Resolving Conflict in the First-Year Classroom

In an increasingly-divisive and hostile political environment, discussion of sensitive political, religious and social issues in the first-year classroom comes with myriad challenges, not the least of which is the oft-lamented study apathy. However, there are several strategies that can engage first-year students in healthy, respectful, and productive discussion in the classroom. This session outlines a few that have worked particularly well in the current classroom. 

Muhammad Shaft, Nazareth College, Nazareth Interfaith Center
Globalization, Inclusivity, and Dialogue

In addition to other challenges, globalization presents us with issues of social difference, both visible and invisible. Race, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, religious beliefs, veteran status, and other characteristics compel us to engage ourselves, faculty, staff, and students in a continual educational process and dialogue across difference to create inclusive campuses in our pursuit of social justice. This presentation will layout some steps that are taken by our College to ensure equity through inclusive education, civic engagement, and dialogue on campus and in the wider community.

Curtis Wright, Wagner College
Standing at the Corner of Safety and Comfort: Creating Inclusive Communities by Having Hard Conversations

Many campuses are grappling with the ability to balance the need to create spaces that both support students in their exploration of issues of social justice and equity while encouraging them to move to the edge of their learning curves. At Wagner College, we are leaning in to this conversation by creating trainings for faculty, staff and student leaders that challenge participants to interrogate the difference between “safe spaces” and “uncomfortable conversations.” This session will explore techniques for facilitating difficult dialogues and strategies that have proven successful for our diversity and inclusion programming at Wagner College.

 

Thursday Plenary Sessions:

Frederick Lawrence
“The Contours of Expression: Free Speech and Civility”

Across the country, conflicting claims of free expression, civility, and safety raise complex issues on our campuses, in our communities, and throughout social media. How do we balance seemingly opposing values to enable free expression, yet foster a climate of mutual respect and sense of personal safety in our discourse on important topics?”

Libby Roderick
“Difficult Dialogues in Higher Education: Effectively Tackling the Tough Issues of our Times”

Although the ability to conduct difficult dialogues is at the heart of the university mission, few faculty or administrators have been equipped with the skills and tools to do so effectively.  Indeed, numerous faculty report avoiding controversial topics because they lack the necessary confidence and skills to ensure productive discussions.  The capacity to conduct meaningful conversations on difficult topics is critical for American universities as we strive to equip our students to find ways to tackle daunting social, environmental, political and economic challenges in an ever more diverse and stressed democratic nation.

Libby Roderick, Director of the Difficult Dialogues Initiative at the University of Alaska, will offer an overview of programs and resources that exist to help us engage controversial issues on our campuses.  She will also share best practices, engage participants in a brief difficult dialogue, and help them explore ways to replicate this work on their own campuses.

Summer Institute attendees have many options for housing in the area.

On-Campus

On-campus housing will be available at Valparaiso University during the nights of Monday, June 19, through Thursday, June 22. All rooms are singles with their own private bathrooms. Guests will receive a linen packet (two sheets, a blanket, a towel, and washcloth) upon check-in.

On-campus housing costs $65 per night. You will have an option to register for on-campus housing in the online registration system for Summer Institute. Reservations must be received by June 1, 2017.

Off-Campus

All hotels listed below are less than a mile from campus. The Country Inn, about a half-mile from the Harre Union, our main site on Valpo’s campus, is your best bet for walking to campus as there are sidewalks for the entire route. The Fairfield Inn is also within walking distance, but there are areas along the route that do not have a sidewalk. The Hampton Inn is the farthest from campus and not pedestrian-friendly due to a highway along the route.

Country Inn and Suites
$89/night plus tax
La Porte, 2020 Laporte Ave, Valparaiso, IN 46383
Phone: (219) 476-0000
Please call the hotel directly and ask for the NAC&U rate listed below. If you book online, you will not be able to enter the discount rate.


Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott
$109/night plus tax
2101 E Morthland Dr, Valparaiso, IN 46383
Phone: (219) 465-6225
Please call the hotel directly and ask for the NAC&U rate listed below. If you book online, you will not be able to enter the discount rate.


Hampton Inn & Suites
109/night plus tax
1451 Silhavy Rd, Valparaiso, IN 46383
Phone: (219) 531-6424
You may call the hotel directly to book or book online at http://group.hamptoninn.com/NAC-and-U-Conference.


Getting to Valparaiso

Valparaiso University is about a one-hour drive from the Chicago area.

From O’Hare and Midway Airport:

  • Take I-294 South (Tri-State Tollway) to I-80/90 East, towards Indiana.
  • When I-80 and I-94 split, you can take either highway, I-80 joins I-90 and is a toll road while I-94 remains toll free.
  • In Chesterton, take the Indiana 49-South exit to US-30 West.
  • After passing through the second stoplight, you will see the entrance to campus on your right.

* From Midway, take Cicero Avenue south to I-294.

Car Service:

American Limousine Service (for service between Chicago airports and Valparaiso)
1-800-729-1623
www.americanlimo.org

Below is a list of suggested readings prior to the 2017 Summer Institute:

Campus civility in the age of President Trump
by President Donald Farish from the Higher Ed in Crisis blog

‘Not Your Language’: How a Classroom Interaction Led a Student to Speak Out on Microaggressions
By Fernanda Zamudio-Suaréz in The Chronicle of Higher Education

Micro-Barriers Loom Large for First-Generation Students
By Eric Johnson in The Chronicle of Higher Education

An Effort to Foster Tolerance in Religion
By Laurie Goodstein in the New York Times

AGB Board of Directors’ Statement on Campus Climate, Inclusion, and Civility

If you have suggestions for additional readings, please send the links to Michelle Apuzzio at apuzzio@newamericancolleges.org.

Map for Valparaiso University

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